Informal Intimacy
third prize london affordable housing copetition 2018





Social Housing is a form of housing aiming to provide affordable housing for a diverse population, the architectural plan should therefore enable reasonable housing opportunities for a larger mass; including those who can not meet the rising housing prices in the cities such as students, single parents, newly - arrivals and people with health conditions or impairments. At the same time, since the modernism’s breakthrough, development has resulted in a standardized and uniform architecture for this type of housing form. An architecture that in most cases consists of repeated strong structures, whereas the individual features are secondary.

The projects premise emphasizes on a critique towards this monotonous development assuming no spatial or personal subjectiveness; instead the project intends to accentuate architectural possibilities for a heterogeneous group with very different wishes, hopes and dreams for their lives. Repeated standards, without any variation or flexibility, thus becomes an overly simple answer to the different needs of the people residing in social housing.

As society has changed, since modernisms first breakthrough, the traditional spatial separation between housing, production and consumption has been blurred, instead a more complex overlapping between housing, production and consumption has made way.
The question of how we live and what opportunities social housing as an architectural format has to offer requires new answers.  

The project intend to establish a new architecture for social housings. An architecture that is flexible and offers a wider range of spatial combinations, different resident constellations as well as interpretative prerogative based on different ways of life or identity.

The intention is to break free from traditional thoughts on private, semi-private and public space, production and recreation, and instead create spaces for many different possibilities and interpretations.

























































Mark